Scott Penrose

WebHistory

Scott is an expert software developer with over 30 years experience, specialising in education, automation and remote data.

Difference between revision 1 and current revision

No diff available.

Web History

One of the greatest thing about the internet, and specifically the web, is the ability to have a URL to define a thing. There has been a lot of effort lately put into the idea that all of the internet needs to be dynamic.

Dynamic content is important. But the internet is both a dynamic media outlet and a library. Although these are simplistic ideas, there is value in the historic library aspect.

Every time a newspaper, news letter from a club, book or journal get printed a copy is kept permanently in a national library.

This is not the case with internet, well not mostly.

If you publish an article, in blog, pdf, or plain old HTML format, that URL should not change, and the content should be there for the long term.

Keep that history

Organisations like Archive.org have understood that although it is ideal to keep content in one place for a long time, that the sites themselves are run often by individuals or even companies that are not going to be around forever. These groups exist to capture the information that may not be kept by the individual.

The alternative

Now for an alternative we use big organisations, that are going to be around, or be taken over. A good example of this is Flikr, Wikipedia, You Tube etc. These organisations are big, and content should live there (as we can see from You Tube) for a very long time. Also if they do plan to disappear (is Flikr going to go broke? it might) they are likely to be taken over and content mirrored or moved, or kept by archive.org.

So we think that putting our long term content on sites like this is important.

And then there is Google Video

As a non-Flash user, I loved using Google Video. It gave me more options. I also liked higher resolutions etc. Now I have been told, that not only Google Video has stopped uploads (About 2009) but now are going to remove all video and no longer even allow a playback service (2011).

A massive amount of media, and links from other sites, even from magazines and other media in our library are about to be lost.

Sure... degrade the service, remove upload, but just keep the old links.

Shame on Google.